A Sudden Storm/The Seashore

Sometimes when working on a poem I’ll end up with different ways of using the same verses or lines.  Usually only one makes it to the final cut, but I guess when I was younger I didn’t mind (or notice) so much.  This pair show it pretty well.  Enjoy!

 

A Sudden Storm
The sun is shinng high above,
Gulls are flying like a dove.
The sun is casting a golden glow,
Above the water’s flow.
 
The waves are getting bigger,
 As they wet a lonely figure.
They crash onto the shore,
As they wrench the sea-life off the floor.
 
A storm is brewing fierce and strong,
Each thunder clap sounds like a dong.
The waves that tower high,
As a gull struggles to fly.
 
Slowly the storm dies down,
It leaves the rocks with a seaweed crown.
A sea-otter floats past,
As an albatross dives down so fast.
Pre-2000

 

 

The Seashore
The sun is shining high above,
Gulls are flying like a dove.
The sun is casting a golden glow,
Above the water’s gentle flow.
 
Each day new families hatch,
The seaweed’s moved to a different patch.
A sea-otter floats past,
As an albatross dives down so fast.
 
Soft white sand,
Warm blue seas.
Where awkward places hide shoreline gems,
And a light, cool breeze drifts through the cove.
Pre-2000

 

 

Speaking of the seashore, I should be in Whitby by the time this post appears.  How’s that for timing! 🙂

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6 Comments

Filed under Rhymes

6 responses to “A Sudden Storm/The Seashore

  1. re-use is something that was quite common with composers in the 18th century — one doesn’t often see it in poetry. More to the point is how a poet re-works material and often ends up throwing out 90% of their ideas — sometimes those scraps can be picked up and used again.

  2. Anybody writing as well as you about storms and seashores has my reading heart 😀
    Good stuff here.
    Blessings

  3. I enjoyed both of them and being a lover of the sea, this totally rocks! 🙂
    thanks for visiting my blog!

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